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Android v. iOS Part 5: Android Is A Two-Legged Stool


RECAP

This week we’ve been looking at the Android and iOS mobile operating systems. In part 1, we looked at how Android was dominating market share. In part 2, we looked at how iOS was dominating profit share. In part 3, we tried to reconcile that seeming paradox. Turns out that, with regard to platform, developer share – not market share – is what gives the platform its value and developer share is what makes a platform strong. In part 4, we showed that iOS was, by far, the stronger of the two platforms. Today we look at why iOS has an inherent advantage in platform, why Android has an inherent disadvantage in platform, and what that means for the futures of these two great mobile operating systems.

A PLATFORM IS MUCH MORE THAN JUST HARDWARE AND AN OPERATING SYSTEM

A computing platform is made up of (at least) three parts: hardware, operating system and an application ecosystem. An application ecosystem is also make up of three parts: well-paid developers, a high volume of quality applications (apps) and lots of happy customers buying those apps.

Android boasts some of the finest hardware in the world. And their operating system is arguably second to none. The Google team is world class. Their operating system is chock full of features and it iterates at an incredible pace.

But when it comes to application ecosystem, iOS rules and it isn’t even close. While Apple’s iOS leads the world in profits, apps, well-paid developers, paying customers, customer satisfaction and retention, Android leads the world in:

– Malware (Source)
– Piracy (Source)
– Cloning (Source)
– Confusing buying options (Source)
– Belated operating system updates (Source)
– Hardware fragmentation (Source)
– Underpaid developers (Source) and dwindling developer interest; (Source) and
– Customers who won’t pay for Apps (Source)

WHEN IT COMES TO PLATFORM, iOS HAS AN INHERENT ADVANTAGE

As Tim Bajarin previously wrote for Tech.pinion in “How Apple is Cornering the Market in Mobile Devices“:

“While all of (Apple’s competitors) think that they can compete with Apple when it comes to hardware, and maybe even software, what they all pretty much know is that the secret to Apple success is that they have built their hardware and software around an integrated ecosystem based on a very powerful platform. And it is here where their confidence level lags and the “iPodding” fears raise its head. And to be honest, this should really concern them.”

“Apple is in a most unique position in which they own the hardware, software and services and have built all of these around their eco-system platform. That means that when Apple engineers start designing a product, the center of its design is the platform . For most of Apple competitors, it is the reverse; the center of their design is the device itself, and then they look for apps and services that work with their device in hopes that this combination will attract new customers. In the end, this is Apple major advantage over their competitors and they can ride this platform in all kinds of directions.”

WHEN IT COMES TO PLATFORM, ANDROID HAS AN INHERENT DISADVANTAGE

Android is based on an “open” philosophy. In software and web-based architectures, an open platform:

“describes a software system which is based on open standards, such as published and fully documented external programming interfaces that allow using the software to function in other ways than the original programmer intended…” – Wikipedia

Open has many advantages – but it has many inherent disadvantages too. The very same open policies that make Android’s sales stronger are the very same open policies that make Android’s platform weaker.

An open policy towards carriers encourages rapid dissemination of devices but it also permits the carriers to take unwanted liberties with Android’s core services and allows them to shirk their responsibilities with regard to operating system updates. An open policy towards manufacturers allows for rapid hardware iteration but it also creates rapid hardware fragmentation. An open policy towards the sales of applications leads to a wide variety of apps but it also leads to a wide variety of piracy, cloning and malware too. An open policy towards the operating system allows for rapid feature iteration but it also allows competitors to split off a confusing variety of competing operating systems and App Stores too.

Open is not bad or good, it’s a tradeoff. But what open giveth Android in sales, it taketh away in application ecosystem. The very same things that makes Android sales strong are the very same things that makes Android’s platform weak. It’s inherent and intractable. The only way to make Android’s platform stronger is to make it less open. And the less open Android becomes, the fewer advantages in sales it has.

THE ANDROID PLATFORM RESTS UPON A TWO-LEGGED STOOL

A stool needs at least three legs to support it. A platform needs at least three legs to support it too. The first leg is hardware. The second leg is operating system. The third leg is application ecosystem. For the sake of argument, let’s assume that the Android hardware and the Android operating system are equivalent or superior to iOS.

Android’s third leg – its application ecosystem – is weak. Terribly weak. And just as two legs are insufficient to support a stool, the two legs of hardware and operating system – no matter how strong – are insufficient to support a computing platform.

The Android and iOS wars are not what they’ve been made out to be. The combination of great hardware, great operating system and an open architecture has made Android THE premiere smartphone of our times. The sales numbers prove it.

But the story doesn’t end there. The combination of great hardware, great operating system and a great application ecosystem makes iOS THE premier smartphone platform of our times. The profit numbers prove it.

Android aspires to be a great device. iOS aspires to be a great platform. Both have achieved their objectives – which will lead them down radically different paths with radically different futures.

Coming Next Week: Android v. iOS Part 6: The Future

Android v. iOS Part 1: Market Share
Android v. iOS Part 2: Profits
Android v. iOS Part 3: Network Effect
Android v. iOS Part 4: Developers



Related Columns and Analysis:

  1. Android v. iOS Part 2: Profits
  2. Android v. iOS Part 3: Network Effect
  3. Android v. iOS Part 1: Market Share
  4. Android v. iOS Part 4: Developers
  5. The iOS and Android Mobile Web Disparity
  • Next issue. This series is becoming a tease. It is obvious that Falkirk expects his readers to understand the dying institution of anticipation. In a time when Santa Clause is dead and kids demand there presents weeks before the big day, anticipation has become a thorn in the foot. I expect this three day weekend to drag.

  • “This series is becoming a tease.”-mhikl

    Sorry, mhikl. The series will conclude on Tuesday. I didn’t mean to stretch the series out, but I felt that each section needed it’s own space. Hope you ultimately agree.

  • I do agree. I thought the short and narrow approach dead on. The narrow focus of each part leads to better discussion around central, crucial points. As well, fewer lines of print mark succinct as the best approach in these hurried times. Sourcing sets a standard for the detail and critically or skeptically minded to gather more info before judging.

    I have copied each article part to VoodooPad and can highlight points and sketch outlines and details to the points for ingestion and understanding.

    I’m of an older world where anticipation is half the fun.

  • OT:
    “I’m of an older world where anticipation is half the fun.”

    Then my daughter must have an old soul. I tried for the longest time to start a tradition of opening one Christmas present on Christmas Eve. She would have none of it!

    But then I also remember “punishing” her by restricting her TV time. Didn’t phase her in the least. Her mother and I, however, were driven nuts. I wanted to make her bed time earlier so we could watch TV!

    Ah, kids.

    Sorry about the diversion. Carry on!
    Joe

  • An opinionated editorial on a techsite is a tease? You really need to get out of the house and go get a girlfriend.

  • Don’t read it if you don’t like it.

  • “Santa Clause”

    Wasn’t that a Tim Allen movie?

  • Another Apple Fan boy writes an article….

    • Delete.

      Sent from my pocket computer.

    • Exactly. Based on pure opinion and no facts. Interesting how apple got hit with one of the largest malware attacks in the computer world, but the fan boys never seem to remember that. The Android apps are just as good if not better than iOS ones. Apple makes good products, but Android is just as good.

    • “Based on pure opinion and no facts.”-John M Couch

      You’re entitled to your opinion regarding my articles, John, but saying that there were no facts is a bit much. I cited extensive sources both today and in yesterday’s article.

    • You cited sources of opinions and non-validated statistics.

    • I’m always willing to learn, leoingle. If you have knowledge of factual information regarding Android or iOS malware, piracy, cloning, operating system updates, hardware fragmentation, developer pay or consumer purchasing habits please consider contributing it to the discussion. Thanks.

    • I will provide sources. For now, I will just advise you not to sit on two legged stools. You might fall on your iphone in your pocket and break it.

  • You cited: BoyGeniusRport (Apple blog) on the “Malware”, the “Dead Trigger going free” article which was later clarified due to 80% piracy in Android- which then went free on iOS with 60% piracy. On “Cloning” and “Confusion” you cite Ewan Spence, whom editorial record on Forbes clearly shows who he’s rooting for; just look at the tone of this article: “Apple Set To Dominate As The Android Geeks Are Defeated”. On fragmentation you cite MG Seigler. Really, MG Seigler? On “Fragmentation” you cite TechCrunch, now even though they have an Apple bias, it’s not as pronounced as, say, BGR, but let’s get to the issue of “Fragmentation”. I’ve never heard Windows developers complaining about the hundreds of thousands of PC configurations are out there, and the many versions of Windows they run. iOS developers have simply become lazy thanks to Apple presenting an artificially narrowed ecosystem. People want to use a variety of devices, developers develop for them.By the way, I’m a software engineer myself. On the Monetization issue you cite MacDailyNews. If the name is not a giveaway, let’s make it clear that Apple users outspend *every* other user on every category, so much so that even the travel site Orbitz was presenting Mac and iOS users higher priced options at the top of search results. Apple users are simply (in average) wealthier than the rest of the population. The bulk of Android’s massive market share are lower cost devices compared to Apple’s, so no wonder those users spend less. This just means that developers must think of a variety of monetization avenues, ad-supported and the “freemium” models being the most successful so far.
    This opinion piece attempts to appear as a balanced, honest assessment of the Android and iOS platforms, but is nothing more than fanboy propaganda for Apple.

  • You cited: BoyGeniusRport (Apple blog) on the “Malware”, the “Dead Trigger going free” article which was later clarified due to 80% piracy in Android- which then went free on iOS with 60% piracy. On “Cloning” and “Confusion” you cite Ewan Spence, whom editorial record on Forbes clearly shows who he’s rooting for; just look at the tone of this article: “Apple Set To Dominate As The Android Geeks Are Defeated”. On fragmentation you cite MG Seigler. Really, MG Seigler? On “Fragmentation” you cite TechCrunch, now even though they have an Apple bias, it’s not as pronounced as, say, BGR, but let’s get to the issue of “Fragmentation”. I’ve never heard Windows developers complaining about the hundreds of thousands of PC configurations are out there, and the many versions of Windows they run. iOS developers have simply become lazy thanks to Apple presenting an artificially narrowed ecosystem. People want to use a variety of devices, developers develop for them.By the way, I’m a software engineer myself. On the Monetization issue you cite MacDailyNews. If the name is not a giveaway, let’s make it clear that Apple users outspend *every* other user on every category, so much so that even the travel site Orbitz was presenting Mac and iOS users higher priced options at the top of search results. Apple users are simply (in average) wealthier than the rest of the population. The bulk of Android’s massive market share are lower cost devices compared to Apple’s, so no wonder those users spend less. This just means that developers must think of a variety of monetization avenues, ad-supported and the “freemium” models being the most successful so far.
    This opinion piece attempts to appear as a balanced, honest assessment of the Android and iOS platforms, but is nothing more than fanboy propaganda for Apple.

    • Why do you care so much, Amaury Rodriguez? Why do those not interested in Apple and its products come to Apple sites to pick arguments. I have in the past checked out Android sites and found them full of pleas for help and a good group of people are there to graciously assist them. Kudos, but I just left. I could have made comments and suggested the easiest remedy to their plights but I didn’t. I honestly didn’t care enough to for it would have been mean.

      We make our own choices in this world and should we make mistakes, we can choose to learn from them. Some just choose to repeat their errors, but that is their choice and right to do so.

      Why are so many in the Android family so angry and resentful. It’s unbecoming.

    • Amaury Rodriguez, you need to read the articles cited and the information in the article not just the names of the sites. Usually they are just passing on information from elswhere. I chose the links I did either because I didn’t have access to the original sources or because the articles focused on the specific portion of the source that I was referring to in my article.

      Facts are facts no matter who reports them. If you question the facts or you have additional facts to share let me know. I’m always happy to learn – although I’ll admit that I’m not always happy to be taught.- paraphrased from Winston Churchill.

    • Well said most Apple you don’t even realize they’re getting ripped off by sites like Orbitz because they are that clueless. I too will be avoiding the site in the future.

  • Largest attacks in the computer world? And by “apple” do you means “Mac”? Because I’ll take a single large essentially harmless attack of note over 25 years of hundreds of thousands of attacks anyday. Never mind that the article is about the specifics of Apple vs Samsung, not a clarion call to post every half remembered anti-Apple trope you can think of.

  • John Kirk cited sources 9 times. Go ahead, John M. Couch, tell us how that’s pure opinion and no facts.

  • My thoughts exactly….

  • Why don’t you guys go where you belong, and why don’t the webmaster just clean up the comments and throw away these useless posts?

    • I did just clean up the comments that failed to say anything insightful or intelligent. Thanks for pointing it out.

  • “The combination of great hardware, great operating system and an open architecture has made Android THE premiere smartphone of our times. – John Kirk

    Perhaps the commentators should actually read the article before posting their comments.

  • 239 likes on FB…LMAO. This site is going places.

  • I don’t disagree with the overall theme here. The idea that they’re headed down significantly different paths is spot on. Android fits me like a glove. Without android, I wouldn’t even consider iOS. There is nothing appealing in iOS to me. I have a very small number of apps on my phone. The OS, and google apps, provide me with almost everything I need from my phone. When I use an iOS device, I’m always stunned how reliant it is on apps. Just about anything you want to do beyond tell the time or make a phone call requires an app to do, and many of them feel like work around’s compared to the integration in my android device. I accept that some people are comfortable with that, but it isn’t for me. I think if you’re talking about the financial success of the platform for the company that makes it, iOS wins hands down. One might argue that the more the provider profits, the less the consumer gets for their money.

    • “One might argue that the more the provider profits, the less the consumer gets for their money.”

      Thanks for contributing, therealciviczc, a great take. The above is the only part of your post that I disagree with. Let me address it at the end.

      These flame wars help to hide reality rather than reveal it. There is no right phone for everybody. If you said that you liked vanilla and I said that I liked chocolate would that make one of us wrong? Of course not. It’s a matter of personal preference.

      Each operating system has different strengths and weaknesses. Those differences need to be explored without fear that the “wrong” answer will get us burned at a metaphorical stake for being a heretic.

      In regard to profits, higher value commands higher margins and higher profits. No one is forcing anyone to buy higher priced products. They do so freely, willingly and sometimes even joyfully because they believe they’re getting great value for their money. The more perceived value a product or service provides, the more people will be willing to pay for it. High price based on high value is not bad for consumers. It gives the consumer what they want, rewards the company for providing it and encourages others to do the same.

    • An honest account, therealciviczc; it adds some good points to the discussion. I have no resentments when others choose what I would not and I don’t appreciate those who abide by a different rule. Each has his/er right to trod our own paths. Knowledge is what it is really about and such is what these articles are about and are written for the Apple curious.

      Some buy Apple for the quality of build, the ecosystem, for some status points amongst other motivations. There are just as many plausible reasons why others make a different choice. All is good. Anger and resentment does not need to be part of any discussion, as your good entry has shown.

      I do suspect we all make our purchases on some value that others cannot fully understand and each must live with his/er choice. How we value anything in life is a personal decision and responsibility, so ‘choosing wisely’ depends upon knowledge which is what quality information sites like this have to offer.

    • Really great comment and thanks for the personal anecdote. I agree that many, mine included, I don’t use that many apps on my smart phone and I actually find jumping back between my iPhone and my Galaxy Nexus pretty seamless. That is saying a lot of me as an analyst because I was super critical of Android up to the point of Jelly Bean.

      Where the paraody still exists largely is with tablets and particular 10″. I have found all 10″ Android tablets sorely lacking. One may argue that it will catch up but I have my concerns given some fundamental differences in the market as well as sales channel. But it will be interesting to watch.

  • What app do you have on iOS that I can’t get on my Android, other than a few dozen paid baby naming apps, perhaps a paid horoscope app or 2, a dozen more paid options for leveling apps, and other stupid stupid apps that I wouldn’t take for free?

    I have, however, quite a few apps that my mother wishes she could get on her iPhone (such as Google Navigation and Drive, which are NOT part of the Android OS — ie. not included in AOSP but instead in Gapps closed source). I’m not seeing any sense being made in this arguement that iOS has more developers who make better stuff.

    Name just 1 that I would care about that I can’t get (baby naming and browse puppy picture apps don’t count).

    • Agreed. More isn’t better and paid isn’t better. Better is better. iOS has nothing of value that anyone should envy in app selection, in fact from my experience sharing apps of meaning with friends it is the other way around.

    • I agree on the smart phone front. In fact I find the plethora of apps in both apps stores much to overwhelming to find anyway. I love the idea of a large developer community but sometimes I feel its hard to find what I want or what is quality in both app stores.

      I also am finding in our research that many consumers don’t use more than a handful of apps on their smart phones anyway. Having a number of products on both platforms I agree at large that the experiential quality is close. Where I disagree for the time being with your comment is around tablets. I find a wealth of quality tablet apps for my iPad, and I use my iPad for work and productivity not just consumption, that help me effectively get things done. I can not say the same about Android tabs and I have nearly all of them.

      That may change but honestly only if a 10″ gains traction. I think 7″ Android tabs have a shot but those are very different use cases than 10″.

      This battle between Android and Microsoft for platform and hardware wins will de-focus them both from the overall challenge of competing with Apple IMO.

    • Name 1. I have a Nexus 7 and same point, no apps I’ve seen on iPad that seem to bring any value to the table and I wish I could get.

    • Byword, Paper, How to Cook Everything, Snapseed, Photo toaster, tons of magazines and recipe databases, uPAd, iPhoto, Tweetbot. I could go on.

    • I see nothing without equivalents that serve the exact same purpose. Plus, half of that could be replaced with a simple Google search. Why waste your time and money (and memory) with silly apps in place of a Google search?

    • Equivalent does not mean equal. I genuinely find poor substitutes on Android many of the apps I know and love on iOS. I have found that a number of cooking applications I use are far superior to there sister experience on the web if one existed. I cook quite a lot as a hobby and many of the recipe and cooking apps that include nicely laid out instructions, videos, timers, lessons, etc have no substitute on the web. The same is true with many exercise applications I use as well like the Lolo series, Nike + Fuel Band app, etc.

      As I said this is a subjective discussion. What works for me may not work for you and that is perfectly ok. What matters is that I choose the products and the processes that most efficiently work for me to get the jobs or tasks done as easily and perhaps more importantly conveniently as possible.

    • John said “Name 1.”

      Your question was answered in full yet you do not have the honour to be polite about it.

      I was hoping against the obvious that my suspicions would be proven wrong. Sadly not.

  • More like Android and MS will eat into Apple’s share. Not much different than Apple losing the smartphone market.

    • It’s been two and half years, dada, and the trend is towards iOS tablets, not against it. Of course we’ll have to wait and see what happens when Microsoft introduces their tablets in the Fall.

  • Still no valid response from the Mac crowd so I will repeat. NAME ONE.

    • Tweetbot is one for me. The other huge one is email. I have been using Jelly Bean on my Gal Nexus for three month’s now and the corporate email exchange solutions are horrible and fail in comparison to Apple’s Mail app.

      I rely heavily on email for my job and I miss the mail application all the time. So for me it is tweetbot because I hate every twitter client on Android and the corporate mail application.

      Let’s also remember that all of this is subjective.

    • I found that link the day I got this phone from Google at Google IO as I tried to load all the apps I loved on my iPhone to the Galaxy Nexus. I have several problems with it.

      First of all it requires me to root my phone, something I am absolutely not interested in doing. Second, someone stole some of the great work tab bots did and is stealing all the time, energy, and money they put into creating what is one of the best Twitter clients for iOS. Is that the benefit of an OPEN SOURCE ecosystem?

      Beyond that my point about email is the strongest one. I find it simply stunning the poor experience corporate exchange is on Android.

    • You previously stated you have a Nexus. Google did it for you

    • On a side note, working for a DoD contractor I have had no issued integrating email with native client, and I can’t imagine your security to be more intense than ours.

      I have had absolutely no issues or complaints, what exactly is the problem you are seeing?

    • At least two times a day it fails to open a connection, so keeping timely email at bay because of it. Generally will fix after about 15 minutes. We are having issues with nested folders. But primarily it is the interface that I find really terrible compared to Apple’s Mail. No support for threaded emails also feels like a waste of time. Server search is also terrible. The interface is simply cluttered and frustrating all around. When you depend on email as much as I do you require efficiency and for work and productivity I consistently find iOS better for my mobile workflow. I’m sure others feel different but it is what works for me.

      I am making it work but as I said I strongly believe Apple Mail on iOS to be a far superior email client to the all on Android that have to connect to exchange. Gmail app is ok but I don’t use a gmail email as any of my primary.

    • I don’t know who your employer is or what sort of Exchange policies they enforce, but Exchange ActiveSync on Android is a mess. The support you get for Echange policies depends on what phone (or tablet) you have and what version of Android. In some cases, third-party software is required. This Microsoft Technet page is nearly a year old, but I don;t think the situation has changed much: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb232162.aspx. Sometimes a third-party client such as TouchDown is needed. Good Technology provides BlackBerry Enterprise Server-like support to Android (and other OSes), but the enterprise has to be running a Good server.

      By contrast, iOS has solid ActiveSync support baked into the OS and has since version 2 or 3.

      Oddly enough, ActiveSync support is also a mess on Windows Phone 7, one reason for close to zero enterprise uptake. I think they will fix it on 8.

  • “What app do you have on iOS that I can’t get on my Android…”-john

    There are two types of Apps that appear in iOS that do not first appear in Android. The first are big name apps like Flipboard and Instagram that may take a year or more to migrate to Android.

    More importantly, in my opinion, are the company, institution and organization specific Apps. This is where the true lock-in occurs. If a company decides to create a company specific app, unless they are very large, it is unlikely that they’ll create more than one version. And right now, iOS appears to be the platform of choice when one is settling on a company/organization wide mobile platform.

    Here’s a single example. I’ve have a small collection of anecdotal evidence like this:

    “Regis College of Weston said today it will become an all-iPad institution this fall by offering iPads with specific apps tailored to the campus community to all incoming full-time students, and all full-time and half-time faculty members.”

    Note the words “with specific apps tailored to the campus community”. These type of “tailored” apps are being built for businesses, government, entities and other organizations all around the globe.

    • Both Flipboard and Instagram have been available on Android phones for a while now. Did you do any research before you wrote this response?

    • Jozo, I was providing examples of two well-known Apps that took a year or more to migrate from iOS to Android. The fact that:

      - There are seven iOS apps for every three Android apps; and
      – There are over 43 thousand Apple iOS developers and 10 thousand Android developers…

      … that this trend will continue. If you’d like to read more and see the sources for these facts, please see my article from yesterday entitled: Android v. iOS Part 4: Developers.

  • There are plenty of apps in Google Play and no Android users have complained about a lack of apps.

    Maybe developing on Android isn’t as lucrative as iOS, but sorry developers all the users are on Android. Learn to make a living where all the users are. I really doubt its the other way around.

    • Bada, developers make a living on user’s dollars, not on users. A buyer who doesn’t buy or generate advertising revenue is a no sale and of no use to a developer.

  • Wow this is pretty much an anti-Android propaganda piece. The sources from the article are mostly from bias pro-Apple sites.

    • Feel free to submit your own sources from ones you believe are valid that back up any point you feel needs to made to contribute to the conversation. We appreciate healthy debate but feel it should be backed up.

    • “The bottom line is that Android as a business for Google is to suck profits from hardware and put them into Google’s services. Hardware makers do not like this and have huge strains of relationship already because of it.”

      Which hardware makers? Could you back it up?

    • Google is not like Microsoft where they are trying to insert value back into the platform specifically for their hardware partners. Google is better than MSFT in the regard of allowing differentiation but Google for Android is an advertising strategy, nothing else.

      The vendors we speak to are all very concerned about the long term business opportunities of Android. How long did it take for the Galaxy S3 and the Nexus to get below $99 or go to buy one get one free. Android hardware is a race to the bottom. Now if you were a hardware maker like HTC, Samsung, etc. do you want to be in a race to the bottom?

      As we have researched and explored the business fundamentals, which was the point of John’s series BTW, it is then that you see some issues with the platform.

      The question remains after looking at the distribution of profits in this mobile industry as to who Android is working for. It is clearly working out decent for Google even though they don’t make much money from it yet in their overall revenue split. It is also working for the carriers to a degree even though they have all been honest that the iPhone has delivered more network and data value than any other platform. But others are having a hard go out of it. If MSFT mobile offering begin to gain traction you will see more of the core Android hardware vendors start going more toward MSFT. WHich means you will see less Android hardware on the market as each vendor splits the half dozen or so devices they many each year currently between two platforms.

      In my opinion for Android to remain sustainable in the eyes of the OEMs someone will need to make and sustain a premium Android based smart phone for a length of time. Not release one then drop its price significantly after three months.

  • Read the facts included in the reports. Facts are facts no matter who reports them.

    • but is it the truth? facts can be skewed you know. Don’t forget Android is improving and developer are just starting to recognize Android market share since ICS. The problem with Android was the pre-ICS which is the majority of the Android today, most developer like myself didn’t want to develop in pre-ICS Android because we felt that it is not ready yet. But that changed when the ICS and now Jelly Beans got release. We feel Android is ready for making money for developers. Actually many developers are now converting their iOS app to Android, (i.e. Flipboard, Instagram, etc).

      That’s why saying “Android application ecosystem – is weak. Terribly weak.” Tell me what application in iOS that you need doesn’t exist in Android?

  • What happened to the guys comment about this sounding like an anti-android propaganda piece? It vanished (but not before I saw it).

    I wouldn’t expect a site with “pinions” in the name to be so highly censored!

    • It did not abide by our posting guidelines. Which needs to be replaced at the top of the thread but can be found at the bottom. We encourage opinions but when they are disrepectful or result to name calling we delete. That is not a form of intelligent conversation and that is the bar we hold our commenters to.

      1. Our columnists are expressing their opinions. Please respect their opinion and the opinions of other commenters. 2. No selling of products or services. We desire to keep this an ad-free zone. If you use the name of a product or firm as your screenname, your comment may be considered spam and removed.
      3.No ad hominem attacks. These are conversations in which we debate ideas. Criticize ideas, not the people behind them. Please by respectful.

  • circle jerk fanboys!

  • Same here. I only saw it because of Google news. need to change the name from techopinions to applyfanboyopinions.

  • Our goal and the focus of our content is for the industry. We are not trying to be a news site catering to mass consumers like BGR or other tech blogs are. None of us here are journalists but are analysts, technical writers etc. Everyone writing here as experience and credibility established in the industry. We are trying to tackle industry issues. Our content is designed to look at the fundamentals of markets, industries, business etc. If you find that interesting then great we have a wealth of content analyzing many tech companies, products, solutions etc. If not then we are ok with that as well.

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    We hope the conversations that take place on techpinions.com will be respectful, energetic, constructive, intelligent, and provocative. To make sure we all stay on-topic, all posts will be reviewed by our editors and may be edited for clarity, length, and relevance.

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    1. Our columnists are expressing their opinions. Please respect their opinion and the opinions of other commenters.
    2. No selling of products or services. We desire to keep this an ad-free zone. If you use the name of a product or firm as your screenname, your comment may be considered spam and removed.

    3.No ad hominem attacks. These are conversations in which we debate ideas. Criticize ideas, not the people behind them. Please by respectful.

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    The Tech.pinions columnists

    Article source: http://techpinions.com/android-v-ios-part-5-android-is-a-two-legged-stool/9596

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